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Label Love: Go Be Lovely

Our latest label crush? Go Be Lovely, a bath and beauty collection from the… >

Label Love: Go Be Lovely

Our latest label crush? Go Be Lovely, a bath and beauty collection from the makers of Illume, the candle-crafting extraordinaires you know and love. These Anthropologie-exclusive creams, perfumes, bath salts and candles come in three scents that we can’t seem to get enough of—coconut milk mango, Thai lily and cactus verde.

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Souvenir Sips: Vietnamese
Salty Lemonade

What could possibly be more refreshing than a glass of lemonade? As we… >

Souvenir Sips: Vietnamese Salty Lemonade

What could possibly be more refreshing than a glass of lemonade? As we discovered during our recent trip to Vietnam, the unlikely answer is salted lemonade. The perfect balance of sweet and savory, this traditional thirst-quencher gets its nuanced pucker from pickled lemons (and sometimes limes) known as chanh muoi. Our express-lane version calls for a quick overnight brine and mild-mannered Meyer lemons, which play nicely with the salt. Say it with us: ahhh.

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED

1 Mason jar, 24 oz.
Meyer lemons (as many the jar can hold)
2 cups water
1/2 cup kosher salt
Sugar
Ice


HOW TO MAKE IT…

Pickled lemons
After washing the lemons, remove the rind from the top and bottom so a little flesh is showing. Cut the lemons into quarters and pack into the Mason jar. Bring the salt and water to a boil in a small pot. Remove from heat and pour the hot brine over the lemons. Close the jar and let the lemons pickle overnight.

Lemonade
Put two pieces of the pickled lemon in a glass (we drafted our Genisa Glasses for the occasion). Muddle the lemon, add sugar to taste and fill the rest of the glass with ice and water.

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A Walk in the Woods with Anna Collette Hunt

When we happened upon British artist Anna Collette Hunt’s swarm of thousands…>

A Walk in the Woods with Anna Collette Hunt

When we happened upon British artist Anna Collette Hunt’s swarm of thousands of ceramic insects climbing the walls of Nottingham Castle, we had an inkling that her interest in the natural world ran deep. We were right—as a child, Anna curated a museum in her bedroom of her rock, leaf, shell and fossil finds. Hearing that she remains devoted to the outdoors—with her childhood “exhibits” still tucked under her bed—we asked Anna and her sister Jenna to take us on a walk through their local woodland, which, would you believe, is Sherwood Forest of Robin Hood lore. From her past of playing Maid Marian to Jenna’s Robin Hood to her mushroom foraging present, Anna knows the forest (almost) like the back of her hand. She happily obliged our request, and shared some wonderful stories along the way.


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“This is the fringe of Sherwood Forest, with the Major Oak just a 20-minute stroll away. I have visited this spot all of my life: as children, my sister, Jenna, and I used to play in the woods here, getting so muddy. My mother would despair at how many hair ribbons we would lose on our adventures in trees and streams!”

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“My sister is great to have along on adventures. She is far more logical and practical than I. When she comes with me we don’t get lost, and she always brings a nice picnic. When I’m alone the paths are sneaky with my sense of direction, and I often get a bit lost and end up very peckish. But secretly I love getting lost, and I often try to sabotage Jenna’s careful navigation.”

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“The forest is incredibly still this time of year, as if it were holding its breath for spring. Even so, Jenna was able to spot badger tracks, lots of bird trails and a mysterious set of paw prints. Jenna thinks it was a fox, but I think it was a wolf.”

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“My walking boots are my favorite shoes, because whenever I put them on I know I’m going to have an adventure.”

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“I’m always on the lookout for treasures from the forest such as mushrooms, berries, pinecones, and interesting twigs or leaves. We were delighted to stumble upon a little cluster of oyster mushrooms, which are my absolute favorite. We also found lots of Turkey Tail fungus, which you can stew to brew a special immune-system-boosting broth, perfect for the winter months.”

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“Sherwood Forest is very old, and you can feel this. When I wade amongst the bracken and ferns I love to hear the whispers of the trees and imagine the sort of stories this forest could tell if it could talk. Sherwood Forest feels far more magical than any other woodland I have visited.”

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Tastes of our Travels:
Vegetarian Banh Mi

After returning from Vietnam, our banh mi cravings have gone from occasional… >

Tastes of our Travels: Vegetarian Banh Mi

After returning from Vietnam, our banh mi cravings have gone from occasional to non-stop. And while these addictive sandwiches aren’t too difficult to hunt down stateside (any foodie worth her sea salt should be able to point you in the right direction), we’re pleased to report that they’re a cinch to whip up right in your own kitchen. Stuffed with caramelized, sweet-and-spicy cauliflower, our vegetarian rendition gets a zippy finish with lemongrass aioli and do chua, Vietnamese-style quick pickles.

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                               Served on the Jardin Des Plantes Dinner Plate.

WHAT YOU’LL NEED

For the cauliflower:
1 head cauliflower
1 cup soy sauce
1/2 cup brown sugar
2 tbs. sesame oil
2 cloves garlic, crushed
1/4 cup sweet chili sauce
3/4 cup water
Sriracha to taste

For the aioli:
1 cup canola oil
2 pieces of lemongrass, 6 inches each
1 large egg yolk
2 tbs. lemon juice
Salt to taste

For the do chua:
2 large carrots
1 daikon
3/4 cup water
3/4 cup rice wine vinegar
1/4 cup sugar

For the sandwich:
1 sesame baguette
Shredded romaine
Fresh cilantro
Jalapeno (optional)
Cracked black pepper



HOW TO MAKE IT…

Cauliflower
Cut the cauliflower into bite-sized pieces and set aside. Combine the remaining ingredients to make the sauce; add the cauliflower to the sauce and marinate overnight. Before serving, cook the cauliflower in a frying pan over high heat until it begins to caramelize in the sauce.

Aioli
Cut the lemongrass in half lengthwise and massage with your fingers. Add the lemongrass and oil to a small pot and let simmer for 20 minutes. Let the oil cool to room temperature, then remove and discard the lemongrass. In a food processor or blender, combine the egg yolk, lemon juice, and salt. While the blade is running, slowly add the oil in a thin stream. If it gets too thick, add a splash of water.

Pickles
Use a mandolin to cut the carrot and daikon; set aside in a glass bowl or jar. Combine the water, vinegar, and sugar in a pot. Bring to a boil, remove from heat, then pour the hot brine over the veggies. Let cool. (These can be made ahead of time.)

Sandwich
Start by cutting your baguette in half lengthwise and lightly toasting it. Spread a layer of lemongrass aioli on one side, and on the other add the cauliflower along with some of its sauce. Top with the do chua, shredded romaine, chopped cilantro, sliced jalapeno and a little cracked pepper.

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Now That’s Entertaining: Chocolate-Stuffed Vegan Beignets

A vegan cookbook isn’t usually the first place we’d look for a dessert recipe… >

Now That’s Entertaining: Chocolate-Stuffed Vegan Beignets

A vegan cookbook isn’t usually the first place we’d look for a dessert recipe—let alone a decadent, chocolate-stuffed, deep-fried one. But then again, Rich Landau and Kate Jacoby aren’t your typical vegan chefs. The husband-and-wife team behind Philadelphia’s much-loved Vedge restaurant are veritable veggie wizards, not bound by the laws of butter or charms of cheese. Sugar-dusted and seriously addictive, these beignets are just one of the surprising treats in their latest cookbook.

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WHAT YOU’LL NEED

(Makes 24 beignets)
¼ cup granulated sugar
1½ tsp. active dry yeast
3½ cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp. baking powder
½ tsp. salt
½ cup vegan cream
2 tbs. vegan shortening
1 cup bittersweet chocolate chips
1 cup powdered sugar
1 tsp. ground cinnamon (optional)
4 cups canola oil for frying

HOW TO MAKE IT…

Stir together the granulated sugar and yeast in a small bowl with 1 cup warm water (about 110°F). Once the sugar is fully dissolved, set the mixture aside for about 20 minutes to let the yeast activate. Meanwhile, sift the flour, baking powder, and salt into a large bowl.

Warm the vegan cream and vegan shortening in a small saucepan over low heat just until the shortening dissolves, about 5 minutes. Stir the cream mixture and add it to the flour mixture. Stir until just combined. Add the yeast mixture and begin kneading with your hands until the dough is smooth, about 2 minutes. Cover the dough with a kitchen towel or plastic wrap and set aside in a warm area to rise for 1 hour.

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Line a sheet pan with parchment paper. Cut the dough into four sections, then cut each section into six chunks. Flatten each chunk into a little disk and place about 10 chocolate chips in the center. Bring all the edges up to meet each other like a little Chinese dumpling, then pinch together a tight seam. Set the sealed beignets on the prepared sheet pan. You can refrigerate the stuffed beignets or keep them at room temperature for up to 30 minutes while you heat your fryer.

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Sift the powdered sugar and cinnamon (if using) into a medium bowl and set aside. Heat the canola oil in a medium saucepan to 365°F, using a deep-fry or candy thermometer to measure the temperature. (A countertop fryer will also work beautifully, if you have one.) Fry four beignets at a time for 4 minutes each, flipping them halfway through cooking. Remove the beignets with a slotted spoon and transfer to a plate lined with paper towels. Let the beignets rest for 20 seconds before lightly tossing them in the bowl of powdered sugar. Serve immediately.

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             Find out how to make two fresh veggie dishes from Vedge here.

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Meet the Maker: Ruan Hoffmann

We’re so fortunate to work with so many exceptional artists on collaborations… >

Meet the Maker: Ruan Hoffmann

We’re so fortunate to work with so many exceptional artists on collaborations and collections, but we’re especially excited to be joining up with Ruan Hoffmann, the South African artist whose creations normally end up on gallery walls, rather than in individual homes. For the launch of the Anthropologie-exclusive Jardin des Plantes collection, we caught up with Hoffmann to hear more about his inspiration, his roving “studio” and what other ideas he has for future designs.

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Can you talk about your inspiration for the Jardin des Plantes collection?
I named the collection after Les Jardin des Plantes in Paris. Flowers can be such a clichéd topic until you look at them and you rediscover the obvious—that they are wonderfully complex objects of great beauty. Seeing this sets about a whole new thought process about their limited lifespan and how it mirrors our own. I wanted to name the collection after this place I love to visit that is full of amazing things. Hopefully, people will also get lost in daydreams while using and looking at my objects.

If you’re in Paris, here’s how you get there…
Location: Place Valhubert, 5th arrondissement 

Metro: Gare d’Austerlitz (Line 5, 10)

RER: Gare d’Austerlitz (Line C)

Bus: Line 24, 57, 61, 63, 67, 91


We understand you’re quite the globetrotter. How does your love of travel get worked into your designs?
It filters through eventually. I usually have quite extended stays because getting there and back is such trauma—to fly is really for the birds!—so it becomes part of my daily life to live in a new city. Much later, elements are referenced and appear in artwork.

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Let’s talk shop: describe your workspace.
I do not have a traditional studio. I am always working, so I carry gauche paints and paper with me, and always travel with a brown cardboard roll stuffed with work. I lease the ceramic studios I work in for a limited period.

What other disciplines outside of painting and sculpture influence your creativity?
The people I love and their thoughts. Food, music, contemporary dance. To read, to be alive and to be healthy is more than enough influence.

What are you looking to explore in future collections?
I would love to partner with skilled artisans on hand-blown glass. Or knotted rugs, tapestries and other textiles exploring geometric shapes based on some of the painted images that I manipulated on the laptop. I would love to do furniture, perhaps a sofa that two people can spend a whole day on—except for going to the loo, of course.

If you weren’t creating art, what would you be doing?
Sitting quietly with my partner looking at the sea.


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A Collection Most Curious

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Tucked away on a quiet city block, our visual communications manager Kayte’s house looks much like any other Philadelphia row home from the outside—tidy, brick and unassuming. But stepping through the front door is like stumbling upon a hidden magpie’s nest. Every surface is covered with curated objects—jars of buttons, bolts of brightly colored fabric, a drawer of handmade pompoms, matryoshkas clustered on a vintage tray, all carefully watched over by Bruce, her orange-and-white Maine Coon. While we could spend hours poring over Kayte’s collections, it was her brooches and the stories behind these pretty little somethings that truly captivated us.



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“My collection obsession began early. When I was a child, I set up a museum in my bedroom and charged people five cents to come look at rocks, arrowheads and seedpods that I had found outside.”

“I love brooches because they’re great conversation starters. They’re one thing I let myself go crazy with—you can wear a wacky brooch with just about anything and get away with it.”


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“My mom acquired this teeny fish when she was a little girl. It was lost for a while, but she recently found it in the pocket of one of her vintage dresses and passed it on to me.”


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“Brooches look great on lapels, but you can also pin them on a belt, in the middle of a shirt or use them to brighten up a winter coat. Hair clips and shoe clips work as brooches, too!”

“Many of these pieces come from my grandmother’s costume jewelry collection. She had a whole dresser full of trinkets, and as child I loved rooting through each drawer—I never knew what I would find hidden inside.”

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Make It Happen: A Shibori DIY

Erstwhile summer camp tie-dyers, have we got a DIY for you! Instead of day-glo hues… >

Make It Happen: A Shibori DIY

Erstwhile summer camp tie-dyers, have we got a DIY for you! Instead of day-glo hues and rubberband-bunched tees, however, we’re working with the refined techniques of the Japanese art of shibori. Traditionally created using indigo dye (which dovetails nicely with our current obsession), shibori dyeing yields simply beautiful, utterly one-of-a-kind results. For this tutorial, we’re focusing on two methods: arashi, accomplished by dyeing fabric wrapped around a pole, and itajime, a resist-dyeing technique involving folding. Ready to give it a try?

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For both techniques you’ll need:
Shibori dye kit
Linen or cotton fabric
Rubber gloves
Bucket Scissors

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For arashi (wrapping):
PVC pipe
Cotton twine

Wrap fabric diagonally around the pipe. Tightly wind the string around the fabric, and tie. Scrunch the fabric around the pipe to create ridges and nooks for the dye.

For itajime (folding):
Small wood blocks
C-clamps

Fold the fabric like an accordion, length-wise. Fold again into a square. Sandwich in between the wooden blocks, and clamp tightly.

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Dyeing:
Dip the wrapped or clamped fabric into plain water. Following the directions on your shibori dye kit, then dip the fabric into the dye bucket for about a minute, gently manipulating it to ensure that the dye distributes evenly.

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Remove the fabric and let the color develop for about twenty minutes. For a darker blue, repeat dyeing for another minute and let dry again. Rinse the fabric with water and undo the string or clamp to reveal your creation.

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Yinka Shonibare MBE: Magic Ladders

Listen in as the ever-talented Yinka Shonibare—whose 17-work exhibition… >

Yinka Shonibare MBE: Magic Ladders

Listen in as the ever-talented Yinka Shonibare—whose 17-work exhibition, Magic Ladders, debuts January 25 at The Barnes—explains the inspiration behind what may be his most captivating and provocative work to date. As the show’s sponsor, we could not be more honored to have become acquainted with such a talent, nor be more proud to be associated with our favorite hometown museum.

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Personal Styling: Get Sporty Chic

If you’re looking for a lesson in sporty chic dressing, consider this your crash…>

Personal Styling: Get Sporty Chic

If you’re looking for a lesson in sporty chic dressing, consider this your crash course and our personal stylist Christina your guide. This off-duty trend is all about looking effortless—no, not in that haphazard just-rolled-out-of-bed kind of way, but in a way that’s laidback, a bit tomboy and yet, still feminine. The keys to pulling it off are twofold, says Christina: first, show off those layers. Skip tucking in your shirttails and instead, let them peek out from under a sweater or jacket (shortcut: go for a pre-layered style like this). Second, add polish with ladylike accessories. Slip on a few gems, grab an elegant bag, and you’ll be set to hit a sartorial home run.

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Want more style advice? Book a complimentary #AnthroPS appointment today.