Fresh Ideas: DIY Mother’s Day Bouquet

May 12, 2017

You could order mom a generic bunch of blooms this Mother’s Day. Or, of course, you could make her a one-of-a-kind bouquet as lovely as she is. Here, Rebecca Gallop—the talented stylist behind A Daily Something—shows us how to create a modern, striking arrangement using spring greens and blossoms.

What You’ll Need
supplies
a vase, planter or other vessel of your choosing
floral pin frog
chicken wire, rolled into a ball
clear floral tape
shears
buckets for flowers

flowers & greens
hanging green amaranthus
mini white calla lilies
white clematis
white larkspur
pale pink butterfly ranunculus
white tecate ranunculus
white sweet peas
deflexus
wedding ivy
plumosa
white scholtzia
jasmine vine
How To Make It
First, prep your flowers and greens. Give stems a fresh 1-2” diagonal cut, removing any leaves from the bottom 3/4 of stems (basically any leaves that may be submerged in water) and place in fresh water.

Next, assemble your supplies. Place pin frog in vessel, then tape chicken wire ball into vessel using the clear floral tape. (Using both a floral frog and the chicken wire will help hold the stems in place and keep taller stems from falling over—we want height with this arrangement!) Fill your vessel with water.

Start defining the shape of your arrangement with the heartier or taller stems: scholtzia, a few larkspur, and a couple calla lilies clustered together. You want one side to be higher than the other. The goal is to create a romantic, free flowing and asymmetrical arrangement, so remember to keep things loose and leave some negative space!

Now, begin to fill out the shape. The hanging amaranthus provides great cascading pieces, while the jasmine vine, plumose, deflexus and ivy will give you a beautiful base shape. You can let some amaranthus cascade or hang out of the vessel onto the table.

Once you have a nice base of greens and taller blooms, begin to fill in the arrangement with the smaller, more delicate flowers. Cluster some of each type of ranunculus together, then fill in any gaps with tender sweet peas and the clematis.

Photography: Abigail Gallop

Bring the outdoors in: shop pots & planters.