Autumn Bloomers: Bridesmaid Bouquets, Flower Crowns & Boutonnieres

October 15, 2014

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Longtime admirers of the graceful, natural style of Brooklyn-based floral designer Nicolette Camille, we asked for her advice navigating the somewhat mysterious world of cool season blooms. Below, she pairs some of her favorite autumn flowers, berries, and vines with dresses from our fall bridesmaid collection.

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Clockwise from top: garden roses, carnation, rose geranium, ranunculus,
andromeda, passion vine, dahlias, blueberry viburnum


Which flowers do you get excited for each autumn?
Autumn is my absolute favorite time of year for flowers.‚ I get excited for dahlias, hydrangea paniculata, the last flush of garden roses, and of course all of the beautiful berries, fruits, and pods.

Are there any unexpected yet particularly beautiful varieties that you would like to share with brides-to-be?
I’m drawn to flowers that have a sort of soft, muddy quality to them because they lend‚ themselves to blending disparate colors.‚ The ˜Cafe Au‚ Lait’ dahlia is the perfect pale cream color, with both undertones of blush and golden ivory. Likewise, the ‘Amnesia’ and ‘Cafe Latte’ roses each have tones of dusty pink to lavender that can‚ really‚ stretch a color palette. I also like the idea of bridesmaids walking down the aisle, one after the next, all holding onto a single garland of pink carnations.

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Clockwise from top: garden roses, sweet autumn clematis,
dahlias, hydrangea, heuchera leaves, carnation


Can you walk us through your design process for creating bouquets that complement different dress colors?
Rich berry tones stand out well against regal blues, creating an elegance that feels right for the season. I thought shades of pale pink dresses, mauve to taupe, were best echoed by dusty blush, nude, and champagne-colored flowers. And for the last look, which felt very ethereal, I used touches of golden, burnt sugar tones, which complement the sage and teal dress, as well as the ivory, so beautifully.

What influences your personal approach to floral design?
I’m inspired by nature that is both wild and cultivated, so I love to highlight both the perfection and imperfections of a flower and its stem. For example, if a leaf is speckled or marked naturally with holes, I would let it be a part of the composition. Paintings by the Dutch Masters are a source of inspiration too.

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Clockwise from top: clematis vine, anemone, spray roses, hydrangea,
porcelain vine, ranunculus, garden roses